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Jan 182018
 

Organization: Global Health Corps
Country: Zambia
Closing date: 18 Jan 2018

This position is a Global Health Corps (GHC) fellowship role. GHC is a leadership development organization focused on building the next generation of diverse, disruptive global health leaders. Founded in 2009, we competitively recruit talented professionals (ages 21-30) from a range of sectors and backgrounds and place them in high-impact roles within partner organizations working on the front lines of health equity in Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda, the US, and Zambia.

The Public Health Analyst will work primarily under the Research Pillar but will also have opportunities to work with our multi-disciplinary team and support various tasks across the other pillars. The position requires research, epidemics and surveillance knowledge, as well as proven data analytical skills (qualitative and quantitative). Excellent oral and written communication skills, strong interpersonal skills, ability to learn new skills quickly and ability to work successfully in multidisciplinary teams are also required. We also value experience with proposal development, literature reviews, grant writing, data collection (primary and secondary data), scientific writing, and data management.

About

The National Public Health Institute under the Directorate of Public Health in the Ministry of Health is a public health center of excellence with a mandate to addresses all major public health concerns in Zambia. We aim to reduce the disease burden in the country by supporting efforts in disease prevention, surveillance, emergency response, and research. Our priority public health functions are carried out under six strategic pillars, namely: (i) Emergency Preparedness & Response, (ii) Surveillance and Disease Intelligence, (iii) Laboratory Systems and Networks, (iv) Research, (v) Information Systems, and (vi) Workforce Development.

Responsibilities

  • Conduct research evidence synthesis (including systematic reviews) in priority areas
  • Evaluate public health interventions
  • Analyze and review research and other public health data
  • Contribute to scientific publications and policy oriented documents
  • Promote the dissemination and uptake of research findings through knowledge translation platforms
  • Provide technical assistance to key users of analytical data where necessary
  • Facilitate housing of data and indicators in the data repository
  • Support surveillance, emergency preparedness, and other public health functions
  • Perform other functions as necessary

Skills and Experience
Items indicated with an asterisk (*) are required

  • Bachelor’s degree*
  • Preferred: Bachelor’s or master’s degree in public health, epidemiology, or related field
  • Experience conducting and synthesizing research, including systematic reviews*
  • Strong skills in quantitative/qualitative data management, including data collection, analysis, and summary/recommendations*
  • Experience writing about scientific subjects*
  • Research grant proposal writing experience
  • Knowledge management and translation experience
  • Demonstrated database management skills
  • Familiarity with research ethics, surveillance, and epidemic preparedness

How to apply:

Public Health Analyst

click here for more details and apply to position

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